Last chance to see….

This week is the last opportunity to see the Trinity College Exhibition in both the Museum Building and Parson’s Building on the main Trinity College Dublin campus. I will be de-installing the work this Friday morning.

I will be sad to take the work away as it feels like the end of a very long journey with the majestic Oregon Maples of TCD. On the other hand we really enjoyed engaging with the decendant Oregon Maple growing through the Parsons Building.

You never know where the Trinity College Trees Team will focus their attention next!

I have already posted a blog about the architectural extension to the Parsons building designed by Grafton Architects. Since I started working with David Taylor in 2013 I have always been interested in how the original and extension to the Parsons building were designed to abut each other.

https://trinitycollegetrees.wordpress.com/2019/01/25/building-extension-incorporates-oregon-maple/

After spending some time looking at the buildings and more specifically the extension from numerous viewpoints I really grew to appreciate the lines created by the Architects’ designs and how the architecture encapsulated and protects the Oregon Maple tree from the full brunt of any storms that occur.

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I spent a good amount of time a month or so ago photographing both the interior of the parsons building where the old building is visible inside the new extension and from the outside. I am still drawn to the area where bricks from the original 19th Century building were deliberately preserved and are on display in the main corridor. The idea that where both building meet is visible inside and the fact that this outside of one building in now part of the inside space draws me to think of notions of liminal, between spaces where time and memory are layered, preserved and celebrated.

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I spent a considerable amount of time photographing this area from a variety of angles. I have chosen one of these images to include as part of a light box piece in the exhibition.

Where the two buildings met outside was not as visually interesting for me. I was more taken by the area where the Oregon Maple and the new extension met.

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There was one particular exterior image that caught my eye and I decided to do some line drawings to represent it. I was keen to engage with the idea of in between spaces and layers to reflect the notions that the building bring about for me.

I decided to start by drawing on different types, grades and sizes of tracing paper. Many many hours and drawing later I was happy with some of the results. The pieces I have chosen to include in the exhibition are in fact drawn on cork board and will be installed either inside or beside the noticeboards in the Parsons building space.

The drawings on tracing paper I have decided to use in a different way. In many ways I think they liken architectural drawings and I decided to play on this and extend the representation to roll them up and use them like pillars, all be it deliberately weak ones that might fail and crumple at some point during the exhibition, a fact that I am happy may occur. This of course would mirror some of conversations between David Taylor and I over the years and more specifically some of his recent scientific research. The light box that they are installed on emanates a gentle light from inside the rolled paper illuminating the drawing, which is layered on itself.

Again more images to follow after the installation is up.

2017 SEM images – part 1

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After recently posting a reminder of the beautiful SEM images taken by Clodagh Dooley of AML in TCD I am delighted today to post some new wonderful SEM images taken of samples from the sibling Oregon Maple that was recently felled in Trinity College Dublin.

Colin Reid of the CMA (Centre for Microscopy and Analysis), Trinity College Dublin, kindly came to our rescue when Clodagh left TCD. During early August David Taylor and I met with Colin Reid, who had kindly portioned some of his time to work with us to choose sample cuttings, image viewpoints and take some SEM images. The resultant images taken by Colin are beautiful and inspiring.  The following slide show is taken from a seed pod.  

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The following slide show is taken from a cross section of a seed twig. 

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The following slide show is taken from a cross section of a damaged twig. 

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Oregon Maple 2017 SEM images revisited

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Revisiting the wonderful images Clodagh Dooley took on the Scanning Electron Microscope in the Advanced Microscopy Lab, Trinity College Dublin during the summer of 2017.

Since the collapse of the Oregon Maple on the 1st of July 2018 I have been revisiting the work completed by the Trinity College Trees Team on this tree during 2017.

Clodagh Dooley took some great images, which later inspired the artwork created by Hassett and suspended in the Oregon Maple during October 2017.  See image above.

To follow a brief recap of some of these images taken of pollen grains (see slideshow bellow and two images of bark lichen which follow the slide show). 

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Behind the artworks – The Oregon Maple

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The Oregon Maple, location: Main square.

The main point of interest for our team and key inspiration for the artwork was the bracing system. This is a very precise system of high tensile stainless steel cables that have been stretched between the heavy limbs and the main trunk thus spreading the load of the heavier branches throughout the tree.

An interesting piece of information is that when the tree surgeon has drilled the correct size holes to insert the support rods he has only a 30 second time frame before the tree will start to repair itself and begin closing the holes.

Large yellow tendon-line artworks have been created by the artist in response to this tree.  These swathes of fabric will be stretched between the limbs and the trunk of the tree on the left mirroring some of the steel cables in the bracing system.

The material used for the artwork is a large continuous length of elasticated lycra. The imagery printed onto the fabric is inspired by the microscopic photographs taken from a cross section of a small branch highlighting the linear cellular pattern of the maple.  

The team will post some images of this art work after the exhibition opens to the public on Friday 29th of September 2017. 

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Image 1: the scanning electron microscope image that inspired the artwork for the Oregon Maple.  

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Image 2: the in-between image. The artist worked with various photoshop filters and touchup techniques to arrive at the final result.  

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Image 3: is the final artwork that was transferred onto a printing screen.