Update on the trees of TCD

TCT book 1 lo res

If you are lucky to have a copy of the recently launched Trees of Trinity College Dublin (4th Edition) you will have access to the update on the TCD trees.  If you haven’t got a copy as yet I thought it might of interest to post an excerpt from the preface to the booklet written by Daniel L. Kelly and David Hackett, one of the Trinity College Trees team.

 

The TCD collection includes an eclectic mixture of species brought together from all parts of the world. The great majority are deciduous, their changing colours reflecting the rhythm of the seasons. The collection also includes a number of species native to ireland.

What all the trees have in common is that they survive in an urban, inner-city environment, in conditions that are by no means ideal for arboriculture. Although they tend to outlive us, trees are not timeless. In the seven years since the last edition of this booklet was published have seen dramatic changes.

The iconic pair of Oregon Maples in Library square were probably the oldest trees in the College; sadly, one fell suddenly in June 2008 and the other, weakened by fungal attack, had to be felled shortly afterwards.

Oregon Maple falls

Other trees have been lost due to storm damage and as a result of building and other developments.  In the same period, new trees have been planted, and earlier plantings have advanced towards maturity.

Plans for fresh plantings are in gestation. Air pollution has mercifully diminished in recent decades – the increasing diversity of lichens and moses on the trunks and branches is a testimony to this.

However, disturbing climatic trends are becoming evident, with increasing temperatures, greater incidence of drought and increasing frequency and intensity of storms.  Planting plans for the future must take these trends into account.”