Day 4 – which plant to choose?

 

Over the past three days I have published blogs relating to the Physic Garden in Trinity College Dublin. Where our initial sampling has revolved around the research and imaging of the sage plant we have as yet to finalise which plant we would like to be part of the project.

Jane Stout from the TCD Botany Department suggested that I talk to Fabio Boylan about his research pertaining to medicinal plants. Fabio works in the Pharmacognosy area of Trinity College. I contacted Fabio and we hope to meet over the next week or so. I will share some of the highlights from our conversation in a future blog.

Jane also introduced me and the project to Fraiser Mitchell who then introduced me to Hazel Proctor who designed the garden and wrote the booklet about the garden.  Hopefully I will also get a chance to meet and talk about some of her experiences and knowledge of the garden over the coming weeks. Update to follow.

Prior to these meetings I have spent some time looking into the basic properties of and imagery related to some of the easily recognisible herbal plants found in the Physic garden.

In particular I was taken by the secretary glands that appear in the images of the lavender and peppermint plants. See the mosaic of images above, which are a selection of microscopic images from nettle, lavender and peppermint samples. Of course the spiky hairs/fronds that project from the leaves and stems are also amazing to look at. I look forward to learning more about the physical properties and working of these plants. I am also conscious that I haven’t even started to look into the specifics of their healing properties…..back to work for me!

Sampling – the sage plant

David Hackett cutting samples from the sage plant in the Medicinal garden outside the Science Gallery.

Although the sage plant is obviously not a tree we were keen to include it as it will add extra sensory and healing aspects to the project.  

We also expect to get some wonderful images of the hairy surface of the sage leaves.