Behind the art works – the Hop Hornbeam

When researching and developing the artwork for the Hop-hornbeam (Ostrya) I was drawn initially to meaning behind it’s names. The name Ostrya is derived from the Greek word ostrua, “bone-like”, referring to its very hard wood. It is also called Ironwood. These thoughts led me to revisit my collaboration with David Taylor on our exoskeleton project and subsequent two person exhibition in the Parsons Building, Trinity College Dublin in September 2015.

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The trajectory of my own practice since then has included the creation of sculptural elements that took on some of the physical and technical properties of abstracted corsets as exoskeletons.

Images above show the protuberance that I am interested in

The physiology of the tree was also a source of inspiration in particular the lumpy shaped protuberance that snaked around the outside of the tree. It was really interesting to hear from David Hackett that this growth is a direct result of the tree’s reaction to wind factors and it’s environment in general.

My favourite SEM imagery taken from this tree was the microscopic spiky thorn-like structures that were growing on the surface of the branches.   See image below taken by Clodagh Dooley.  Thanks to Daniel Kelly and John Parnell of the TCD Botany Department I now know that they are epidermal hairs, which are only visible on the very young twigs of the Hop Hornbeam.

Hop Horn Beam004 lo res

All these thoughts and inspirations have led me to the decision to create a corset-like protective covering for the large protruding element snaking around the lower trunk. The artwork will be made from bright orange heavy swimsuit-like fabric, cut into various segments and sewn together using corset making techniques. Where normal corsets add boning (a plastic/metal strip inserted into channels sewn in the corset to create of to create structure) I will insert wire between each segment. This will allow the artwork to follow the natural lumps and hollows of the bark. Finally these lines will be accentuated by the addition of electric blue sticky fabric strips and spikes reminiscent of the SEM imagery.

Increased Magnification reveals…

 

The following slideshow highlights the process by which Clodagh choose  an area of interest on the Palm Tree leaf and through increased magnification brought, in this case an individual somata, into sharp focus.

Under each palm leaf there are numerous breathing holes and these are called somata.  They are not unlike the pores on human skin.

Images start at 92 times and end at 1,600 times magnification.

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Another example of this is the seven images Clodagh took of the bark  surface from the Snake Bark Tree.  This time she started at 17 times and ended at 2,720 times magnification.  

Of interest is the pod like structure that Clodagh honed in on.  To date we have been unable to find out what it is but we plan to ask Professor Daniel L. Kelly from the Trinity College Dublin Botany Department to see if he can put a name on this structure/ organism. 

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Trinity College Trees Booklet

Trinity Trees book - front cover- Oregon Maple.jpg

Trinity College Dublin have compiled and printed a booklet entitled Trees of Trinity College Dublin. A third edition was printed in 2011 and it lists many of the trees to be found on campus. This booklet was jointly edited by David W. Jeffrey and Daniel L. Kelly, the later of which we are delighted to say will be consulting with us on some of the botany aspects of this project.

The booklet groups the various trees on campus into three sections. Each section is called a circuit and lists all the trees to be found in a particular area on campus. Circuit A encompasses the Front Square and Library Square. Circuit B includes trees situated in New Square and House 40 gardens. The final Circuit C covers all the trees in College Park.

Trees of Trinity College booklet-List of trees-tcd map-three tree circuts

Trees of Trinity College booklet also gives specific details on a select number of significant trees, three of which will be included in our project. These trees are the Hop Horn Beam, the Oregon Maple and the Cabbage Tree (Cordyline Palm). See below images of two of the listings in the booklet.

Trinity Trees book-Hop horn beam tree information.jpg

Trinity Trees book - Cabbage tree information