Introducing the Rose Garden

 

 

IMG_2984 lo res

Even at peak student population, you’ll sometimes have the Rose Garden to yourself. It is a small intimate space enclosed on three sides. The well-spaced benches and domestic-style planting make it feel like a haven in a busy campus.

I recently spent a wonderful afternoon in the Rose Garden surrounded by the cherry blossoms, which were in full bloom. The flowers created a blanket like structure that seemed to hover overhead defying gravity. I was also captivated by the various species of birds that seem to frequent the space. I was especially delighted to see what must have been an adult bird wandering around on the grass pulling up worms while a young chick followed along greedily eating the food passed to it from its parents beak. I will write more about my time in the Rose Garden in a future post as the responses I received from visitors to the garden will form part of the art work that will be placed in the Crab Apple Tree in September/ October 2017.

The Rose Garden itself is located between the end of Woodward and Deane’s Museum Building and its perpendicular neighbor, the number 40 block of New Square housing, with open space (the rugby pitch and College Park, with the cricket crease and running track) behind railings on the other two sides. The path into New Square is the only open side, and even this feels somewhat enclosed thanks to the large cherry blossom tree planted nearby.

Tree Spotlight – No.1: Cherry Blossom

rows of cherry blossom trees

  • Common Name: Sweet Cherry, Wild Cherry, European Cherry
  • Scientific Name: Prunus avium
  • Distiribution: Europe and Asia
  • Tree Size: 32-65 ft (10-20 m) tall, 1-2 ft (.3-.6 m) trunk diameter

    Colour/ Appearance: Heartwood is a light pinkish brown when freshly cut, darkening to a deeper golden brown with time and upon exposure to light. Sapwood is a pale yellowish color, typically 1-2″ wide.

    Grain/ Texture: Has a fine to medium texture with close grain. The grain is usually straight or slightly wavy.

    Endgrain: Semi-ring-porous; small pores in no specific arrangement; solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; gum/deposits occasionally present; growth rings distinct due to a concentration of earlywood pores; rays visible without lens; parenchyma absent.

    Rot resistance: Heartwood is rated as being moderately durable to non-durable regarding decay resistance. Sweet Cherry is also susceptible to insect attack.

    Workability: Sweet Cherry is easy to work with both machine and hand tools. The only difficulties typically arise if the wood is being stained, as it can sometimes give blotchy results due to its fine, close grain. A sanding sealer or gel stain is recommended. Glues, turns, and finishes well.

    Odour: No characteristic odor.

    Allergies/ Toxicity: Although there have been no adverse health effects reported for Sweet Cherry, the closely related Black Cherry Black has been reported to cause respiratory effects.

    Pricing/ availability: Typically only available in Europe (or from orchards), Sweet Cherry is usually only sold in smaller sizes or as veneer. Prices should be moderate within the tree’s natural distribution.

    Sustinability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Veneer, furniture, cabinetry, turned objects, musical instruments, and carvings.

    Comments: Sweet Cherry is the Old World counterpart to Black Cherry found in North America. Sweet Cherry is said to exhibit a bit more of a color contrast than Black Cherry, and it also tends to be slightly denser and stronger. However, the tree itself tends to be smaller than Prunus serotina, and does not yield the larger sizes of lumber that are available for the American species.

Tree buds SEM images

The following images from the tree bud of the Oregon Maple are really interesting. The undulating surface of the seeds are of particular interest to me. Many years ago I completed a five foot plaster sculpture inspired by a similar seed structure. We may look further at these seeds to get a closer look at the surface and interior structure.

The Oregon Maple

During the sampling process in March we also got some wonderful SEM images from the buds of the Snake Bark and the Cherry Blossom.  See below.  I love the hairy thread-like structures sticking out of the buds.

The Snake Bark – tree bud

Cherry Blossom