Installed artworks: Day 3 – The Hop Hornbeam

The Hop Hornbeam artwork is installed

Ohassett Hop Hornbeam lo res

Close up photograph of the Snake Bark artwork.

An early sampling programme from the Snake Bark uncovered some fascinating finds by Clodagh Dooley.  See below a slide show highlighting some of the wonderful images taken by Dooley.

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From the outset of the project Hassett was drawn to the meaning behind the Hop Hornbeam’s Greek name Ostrua, which translates as “bone-like”, referring to its very hard wood.

Hassett decided to respond to the lumpy shape that snaked around the trunk; a direct result of the tree’s reaction to wind factors and it’s environment. For this artwork she created a corset-like protective covering for the protruding element on the trunk’s surface. Microscopic imagery of spiky thorn-like structures that were growing on the surface of the branches also informed the final artwork.  See images below.

There were many stages in the creation of the artwork for the Hop Hornbeam. From the initial low impact mould of the protruding element to the final installation there were many stages in the creation of the artwork for the Hop Hornbeam. The mould was taken to the studio so design trials could be made. A paper pattern was then created, the fabrics cut out and sewn together in sections. Finally long lengths of heavy wire were inserted into the various sections to support the shape of the overall artwork. Blue sticky fabric was added to accentuate these shapes and be representative of the microscopic spiky elements uncovered by Clodagh Dooley during the sampling process.  The slide show below includes some images of this lengths process.  

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The Hop Hornbeam artwork was installed in late September.  Images below were taken soon after the piece was installed.  

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This second group of images was taken on a very windy but sunny day post storm Ophelia.

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Installed artworks: Day 2 – The Snake Bark Tree

The Snake Bark artwork is installed

Snake bark lo res

Close up photograph of the Snake Bark artwork.

David Hackett taking sample with saw of Snake Bark Tree

   Image David Hackett taking a sample from the Snake Bark Tree, 2016.

An early sample programe from the Snake Bark uncovered some fascinating finds by Clodagh Dooley. See below

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Hassett was drawn in particular to Dooley’s beautiful images of the fungal fruiting body (pod like structure). See image below. 

7 snake bark bark007

Other images taken by Hassett with a normal camera also inspired her to create the final artwork that is currently installed in the Snake Bark Tree. See below some of the first photographs taken by Hassett, which show some of the soma/ breathing holes of the tree.

Imagery of the brightly coloured clothing combinations worn by select sub cultures in Japan during the 1990’s also played a part in the selection of the materials and colours for this piece. 

japanese street style

A close up photograph of detailing the of the SThe images below were taken after the art work was installed in the Snake Bark tree. 

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The following slide show includes installation images taken on a very windy but sunny day post storm Ophelia.

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Installed artworks: Day 1 – The Oregon Maple

The Oregon Maple was the most difficult piece to install.  See images above of both David Hackett and I in a Cherry Picker in the middle of the Oregon Maple tree about nine meters from the ground. We had to organise the Cherry Picker twice, once to reach the highest ‘tendon’ and the second time for the lower two. Of course we will also have to book it one final time to deinstall the pieces on the 29th of October.

Images below are photographs taken of the Oregon Maple artwork fully installed during the first week of the exhibition.

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The images below were take of the Oregon Maple artwork two weeks into the exhibition but before ex Hurricane Ophelia struck Ireland.

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I am glad to say the artwork survived the strong winds largely because of the stretchy nature of the fabric. I will post more images of how the artwork looks post Ophelia before the exhibition ends on October 29th.

Click on the following link to see the information, map and images that are to be found on the stand in front of the Oregon Maple.  Click here to see the Oregon Maple stand information

Download audio guide here

We hope that you enjoy your self guided walk through the Trinity College Trees exhibition.

You can choose from one of two walk options, either starting from the Main Square with the Oregon Maple tree or from behind the Science Gallery at the Physic Garden with the Yew tree. An audio guide has been created for each option. All you need to do is click on your desired option below, listen and enjoy!

Download audio guide here

We hope that you enjoy your self guided walk through the Trinity College Trees exhibition.

You can choose from one of two walk options, either starting from the Main Square with the Oregon Maple tree or from behind the Science Gallery at the Physic Garden with the Yew tree. An audio guide has been created for each option. All you need to do is click on your desired option below, listen and enjoy!

Mooney Goes Wild radio interview airs this Sunday

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image: Eanna ni Lamhna interviewing David Hackett

 

Mooney Goes Wild, the RTE Radio 1 programme, interviewed the Trinity College Trees Team on September 29th. Hear the interview live on RTE Radio 1 between 22.00 and 23.00 this Sunday October 15th 2017.  RTE  will be posting information on this interview nearer the date.

Click here for more information.