Increased Magnification reveals…

 

The following slideshow highlights the process by which Clodagh choose  an area of interest on the Palm Tree leaf and through increased magnification brought, in this case an individual somata, into sharp focus.

Under each palm leaf there are numerous breathing holes and these are called somata.  They are not unlike the pores on human skin.

Images start at 92 times and end at 1,600 times magnification.

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Another example of this is the seven images Clodagh took of the bark  surface from the Snake Bark Tree.  This time she started at 17 times and ended at 2,720 times magnification.  

Of interest is the pod like structure that Clodagh honed in on.  To date we have been unable to find out what it is but we plan to ask Professor Daniel L. Kelly from the Trinity College Dublin Botany Department to see if he can put a name on this structure/ organism. 

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Tomography – the Crab Apple and Snake Bark trees

 

When we were taking samples in February Clodagh attempted to image the small apple fruit from the Crab Apple Tree. She was unable to do so as it contained too much liquid. It dried out and shriveled up over the month and in March she attempted to image it again. The resultant images I think are well worth the wait.  What do you think?

When I looked at these images and those of the macro photos I took of a Snake bark lenticle (see below) they immediately reminded me of topographical images and models. Also see below for some examples.

snake-bark-tree-bark-1-lo-res

Macro image of Snake Bark lenticle, photo Olivia Hassett

These images then inspired a further trawl through the internet to see what other works have been inspired by tomography. This really got me to thinking about the possibilites of working with stacked layers/ layers  of colour or layers of any kind…..more to follow as I progress this idea further.  

layered card? reflection in knife

Topography definition:

The arrangement of the natural and artificial physical features of an area.

The distribution of parts or features on the surface of or within an organ or organism.

Tree buds SEM images

The following images from the tree bud of the Oregon Maple are really interesting. The undulating surface of the seeds are of particular interest to me. Many years ago I completed a five foot plaster sculpture inspired by a similar seed structure. We may look further at these seeds to get a closer look at the surface and interior structure.

The Oregon Maple

During the sampling process in March we also got some wonderful SEM images from the buds of the Snake Bark and the Cherry Blossom.  See below.  I love the hairy thread-like structures sticking out of the buds.

The Snake Bark – tree bud

Cherry Blossom