Download audio guide here

We hope that you enjoy your self guided walk through the Trinity College Trees exhibition.

You can choose from one of two walk options, either starting from the Main Square with the Oregon Maple tree or from behind the Science Gallery at the Physic Garden with the Yew tree. An audio guide has been created for each option. All you need to do is click on your desired option below, listen and enjoy!

Download audio guide here

We hope that you enjoy your self guided walk through the Trinity College Trees exhibition.

You can choose from one of two walk options, either starting from the Main Square with the Oregon Maple tree or from behind the Science Gallery at the Physic Garden with the Yew tree. An audio guide has been created for each option. All you need to do is click on your desired option below, listen and enjoy!

Download audio guide here

We hope that you enjoy your self guided walk through the Trinity College Trees exhibition.

You can choose from one of two walk options, either starting from the Main Square with the Oregon Maple tree or from behind the Science Gallery at the Physic Garden with the Yew tree. An audio guide has been created for each option. All you need to do is click on your desired option below, listen and enjoy!

Behind the artworks – The Crab Apple Tree

The Crab Apple Tree, Malus ‘Golden Hornet’ (Trinity Tree number 298). Inside the Rose garden.

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The Crab Apple is a small tree, bearing attractive pink/white apple blossoms in the spring and small apples in the autumn. It is a native species found in hedgerows and old woodlands throughout the countryside. Unlike modern hybrid apples, crab apples grow true from the apple pips.  See above image of the crab apple tree in the Rose Garden, Trinity College Dublin.

The apple tree is celebrated in Celtic mythology, legend, and folklore as an emblem of fruitfulness and is sometimes seen as a means to immortality.

Each microscopic image taken for this project represents a snapshot in time as each tree, leaf and branch are in a constant state of change. For the crab apple tree artwork the artist decided to engage with this notion of time or more specifically the people that lingered in the Rose Garden between 12 noon and 2pm on Friday the 12th of May 2017.  The resultant artwork reflects the mood and sentiments of ten willing participants who were resting in the intimate and peaceful surroundings of the Rose garden.   

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For the duration of the exhibition Hassett has installed ten perspex pieces, which have been hung from various branches of the Crab apple tree.  This piece is reminiscent not only of  rag trees where people tie ribbons and ask for blessings but also trees of hope and remembrance.  The image above was taken last May and is of a cherry blossom tree in the Rose Garden.  

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Together the ten pieces join to reflect an image taken of the dried out skin of the apple fruit. See image above taken by Clodagh Dooley.

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Etched onto each perspex element, in their own handwriting, is the participants response to the question ‘what do you think, feel about this space?’  See image above – sample of a perspex element.

Guided walk 29/09/17 open to bookings

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Guided walk 29/09/17 at 5.15 open to bookings on Eventbrite

Follow the link below to book a free ticket. Spaces are limited so book early.

Guided walk, Trinity College Trees Exhibition, 29th September at 5.15

Event Description:

As part of the opening event of the Trinity College Trees Exhibition one of the project team will give a guided walk to the artworks installed in eight trees on the Trinity College Campus.

Hear about a select number of wonderful TCD trees and the scientific and artistic inspirations behind the artworks on display. This walk also forms part of the TCD PROBE event for European Researchers Night.

There is a limited number of places on this guided walk. Meet at the main arch in front of the main square, Trinity College Dublin at 17.10, walk begins at 17.15.

Alternatively anyone who would like to visit the exhibition on their own time can download a recorded sound piece outlining information on the trees and the artworks. Visit trinitycollegetrees.wordpress.com.

The Trinity College Trees Exhibition opens on Friday September 29th and runs until Sunday October 29th 2017. Exhibition open during normal Trinity College opening hours.

Behind the artworks – pair of Plane trees

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The pair of Plane trees, (Platanus orientalis) is situated opposite the Law Library in Trinity College Dublin.  See above image above.  

Platanus trees are tall, reaching 30–50 m (98–164 ft) in height and are native to the Northern Hemisphere. Plane trees shed their bark every two to three years getting rid of certain amounts of pollution with the old bark. It is for this reason that they are frequently planted in urban areas.

This pair of trees are genetically related. As a result of an infection during their infancy both trees have an unusual lumpy bark and thick trunks. The lumpy protrusions on the bark are called nodules and continue to grow and regularly fall off the infected lower trunk.

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These nodules were the starting point in the development of the plane tree artworks. Initially Hassett collected a large fallen nodule (see image above of the nodule used) and made a two-piece mould from it. Coloured wax was poured into the mould and expanding foam was added to the interior as a strengthener. Two replica wax works were then created.

Interest in microscopic imagery of the haphazard cell structures (see images above) from both infected barks led to the artist to include a representative pattern of cellular ‘holes’ in both wax works. She used imagery from the right tree in the artwork designed for the left and visa versa for the artwork installed in the right tree. In addition both wax pieces were deliberately installed opposite each other further heightening the connection and unique nature of these two trees.

Of note: the artist spent many hours researching and attempting in vain to develop a viable bioplastic recipe to use in the creation of these works. Wax was the material of choice in the end as it will be interesting to see how the sticky surface and structure of the wax pieces will morph and alter in response to its environs over the course of the exhibition.  

Images of the artworks in situ will be posted after the opening of the Exhibition on the 29th of September 2017.  

Behind the artworks – the Snake Bark

snakebark maple leaves and stripey bark

Snake bark maples include 18–21 species, and are mostly found in eastern Asia. Snake bark maples are most easily distinguished from other maples by their distinctive bark, smooth when young and usually patterned with vertical alternating dark and light stripes as the tree ages.

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See image above, the Snake Bark tree,  which is situated opposite the Berkeley Library.  

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The main inspiration for the artwork that will be installed in this tree was the pod-like structure, unearthed during the microscopic imaging process. See image above.  

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Also included in the artwork are representations of the oblong lenticles, which are breathing holes visible to the naked eye on the green and white striped bark.  See image above.  

The artist was also inspired by Japanese street culture from the nineties represented in books like Fruits and Fresh Fruits.

The artwork created by Hassett is made from neoprene, lycra and lycra netting.  Images of the final artwork in situ will be posted after the opening on September 29th 2017.