Indoor/ outdoor tube sculpture

As part of the exhibition inside the Parsons Building Olivia Hassett also placed another of the layered paper tube sculptures in the exhibition area. Instead of a shorter tube like in the outdoor installation she made a much longer thinner tube that snaked up the wall and over the partition and disappeared into the space behind the exhibition area.

The idea with this piece was to let it seem like the long thin tube was continuous and that it was possibly connected to the other tubes in the outdoor installation. In this case it was an illusion but it highlighted Hassett’s continued interest in the notions of the inside/ outside and liminal spaces in the Parsons Building.

Parsons Installation

Image take of root segment

The installation of tube-like sculptures embracing the trunk of the Oregon maple were modeled on scanning electron microscope images taken by Colin Reid of the microscopic tubes that carried the water and nutrients up the Oregon Maple that fell in 2018.

Comprised of laminated layers of different materials the tubes included a layer of various images printed onto paper from the numerous scientific studies undertaken by David Taylor and Tim Hone, a layer of macerated plant material saved from the fallen trees was over laid on top of the imagery partly obscuring the research. These layers were then embedded under layers of acid free tissue. Finally the structure was coated in a green coloured unique bio plastic protective layer developed in conjunction with Conor Buckley.

All of the tubes were construted on top of a wire armiture that was altered in size and shape each time to ensure that all of the tubes had a different shape. At the time of installation the artist placed each tube in a circle so as to surround the tree trunk. The tubes were held in place for the duration of the exhibition by gardening wire.

These tubes were deliberately made from multiple laminated layers of paper. The installation was designed to alter and change during the exhibition in TCD. In fact each tube buckled, bent and collapsed in different ways mirroring the imagery and elements of the research being undertaken by David Taylor.

The artist was delighted to see the installation alter in such an interesting way during the exhibition. Each week she visited the exhibition and documented the change to the installation. I will add some of the images from these changes in a later blog post.

Last chance to see….

This week is the last opportunity to see the Trinity College Exhibition in both the Museum Building and Parson’s Building on the main Trinity College Dublin campus. I will be de-installing the work this Friday morning.

I will be sad to take the work away as it feels like the end of a very long journey with the majestic Oregon Maples of TCD. On the other hand we really enjoyed engaging with the decendant Oregon Maple growing through the Parsons Building.

You never know where the Trinity College Trees Team will focus their attention next!

Exhibition open to the public until 3rd May 2019

Embrittled | Resilient is a collaborative science, art and conservation exhibition inspired by the majestic Oregon Maples of Trinity College Dublin. Spread over three venues on the main campus it opened to the public on the 28th of March 2019 with a series of talks by David Hackett, David Taylor, Tim Hone and Olivia Hassett outlining the background to their respective areas of research. Olivia Hassett also created a solo performance piece with the Oregon Maple in the Parsons Building.

Solo Performance with Oregon Maple on first floor of the Parson’s Building

See the map and three downloadable information pdf’s below, which highlight the three exhibition venues on campus and give you a bit of information behind the works in each venue.

Map showing the three exhibition venues

The work will be available to view during normal business hours up until the 3rd of May 2019.

To whet your appetite I have created a short slideshow of a few images from the various works sited across the three venues on the main Trinity College Campus. See below.

In the coming days I will highlight individual pieces, give some background information and will post more images. The best way to see the work is of course to come in and see the exhibitions!